Histamine Intolerance: Getting to the Root of Migraines, Eczema, Vertigo, Allergies and More [Podcast] - PCOS Diva
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Histamine Intolerance: Getting to the Root of Migraines, Eczema, Vertigo, Allergies and More [Podcast]

PCOS Podcast 140 - Histamine Intolerance“The whole purpose of what I do is to not put you on a restrictive diet for the rest of your life. It’s to get you to live as normal life as possible. Feel the best that you can, eat as many foods as you can. But obviously we’re always going to want to keep foods that are going to cause inflammation out of your body, but some of the high histamine foods are really nutrient dense. I want you to be able to eat some of these foods again. That’s why we work on these underlying causes.” – Dr. Becky Campbell

Histamine intolerance is the root of many symptoms we write off as environmental allergies such as migraines and hives and flushing, vertigo, congestion or runny nose, low blood pressure, dizziness or lightheadedness, eczema, anxiety, menstrual irregularity, and diarrhea. Dr. Becky Campbell has a solution to determine if these symptoms are actually a function of your diet and how to fix it without eliminating otherwise healthy foods that you love. Listen in (or read the transcript) as we discuss:

  • The symptoms of histamine intolerance
  • The link between histamine intolerance & the development of autoimmune disorders
  • High histamine foods
  • Histamine v. food sensitivity
  • How to manage histamine intolerance

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Mentioned in This Podcast:

Complete Transcript:

Amy Medling:

Today, I’m welcoming back Dr. Becky Campbell. We did a podcast a while ago. It’s podcast number 97, the seven hidden triggers that are keeping you sick, so be sure to check that podcast out. I loved Dr. Becky Campbell’s message, and she just came out with a brand-new book about histamine intolerance. I probably bet that you haven’t heard too much about histamine intolerance, but I think once you’ve heard Dr. Becky Campbell’s message, I think you’re going to have a few ah-has on this podcast.

Dr. Becky is a board certified doctor of natural medicine, specializing in functional medicine and clinical nutrition. She’s the founder of drbeckycampbell.com and the author of another great book that I have on my bookshelf, the 30-Day Thyroid Reset Plan. All of you PCOS Divas that have hypothyroidism or Hashimoto’s, you definitely want to check that book out. I would love to welcome you, Dr. Becky back onto the podcast.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Well, thanks so much for having me back and I’m excited to be here.

Amy Medling:

Your new book, the 4-Phase Histamine Reset Plan, getting to the root of migraines, eczema, vertigo, allergies, and more was a real eye opener for me. It’s a beautiful book. It’s almost like a cookbook. There’s like tons of recipes and beautiful pictures in the back. But the real meat of the book is where you’re really talking about the symptoms of histamine intolerance, what are the root factors and then you have your four step reset. But I would love for you to maybe… I like to start with your story because I think you have a powerful story and I think that there’s a lot of women listening that can probably relate quite a bit. So yes, share your story.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

I can say I probably never felt great even as a kid. There were things now looking back I realized for histamine related, I had trouble with heat. I would pass out in the heat a lot. I would get hives sometimes for no reason. I would get migraines. I was just really tired all the time. Then when I was in college, I gained a bunch of weight and for no reason. I never had a weight problem before. I was getting really bad brain fog and just thought it was the stress of being in medical school. Then I went from doctor to doctor looking to see what was wrong. No one could really figure it out.

Then I found a natural medicine like holistic of center where they discovered I had a thyroid issue, which now we know as Hashimoto’s disease. I did a lot of work with diet and with the gut and I was on medication for a little while and then got off and my thyroid was really good. But there were some symptoms that were left over for the next about decade that I just never really understood. It was really related to food or environment. So, if I was eating something and it would be a healthy food, like let’s say it was eating fermented food, which I love fermented foods, I would get a headache right away, and I would get these weird tingling sensations on my scalp and I would flush, my heart would race, different symptoms.

I couldn’t figure out what was going on. That happened for a while, and then I started reading and learning about histamine and what it is and what it does in the body and I’m not being able to break it down, and histamine intolerance. Then eventually mass cell activation syndrome is what I got diagnosed with, which has one of the leading causes of histamine intolerance. Then once I figured everything out, I took the foods out of my diet and did some more work on myself and live very normal life at this point.

I knew that there had to be so many people struggling with this. I started seeing so many people in my practice with it. That’s what eventually led me to write this second book was because I wanted to spread the word on this cause a lot of people aren’t discussing it.

Amy Medling:

I wanted to have you on the podcast because I’m seeing in the PCOS Diva Private Facebook groups that there are a lot of women posting about symptoms of histamine intolerance. I don’t think that it’s something that’s on people’s radar. They may not even know what histamine is. So, I want you to explain that, but you talk about symptoms like migraines and hives and flushing. Those are what I’m hearing from women with PCOS that are experiencing the same thing. So tell us, first off, what is histamine and maybe explain a bit about histamine intolerance and then talk to us about the different symptoms that are related.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Okay. When people hear the word histamine, their first thought is anti-histamine, right? Because antihistamine medications. So, I think that people associate it as being a bad thing and it’s actually an amazing thing that we have to have in the body when it’s working properly. Basically let’s say you have an allergen, or let’s say you get a virus, your immune system will alert your mass cells, release some histamine, which will dilate your blood vessels and cause inflammation, and then your white blood cells can come in and attack that virus.

In addition to that, it’s also really helpful in releasing hydrochloric acid, which is pertinent to our gut health, and it’s the good message, it’s like a chemical messenger between the body and the brain. So it’s something that we really need. What happens when histamine is released as after its job is done, the body sends in these enzymes to break down the histamine and then we’re back to where we were before. While many of us are lacking… the main enzyme is this enzyme called DAO. Many of us are lacking.

Whether it’s an ability to produce it or just for whatever reason it’s being pushed down as far as how much we have. That it’s not doing its job of breaking down the histamine properly, and so the histamines just sitting out in the blood stream and there’s so many histamine receptors all over the body that it’s getting into all these receptors and it’s causing symptoms all over the body. This is one of the reasons it can be really confusing and really hard to diagnose because if you go to your doctor and you have all these weird symptoms, which I’m going to go over in a minute, they don’t really know what to do with you.

I’m going to talk about some of the main symptoms, but there’s a lot of symptoms related to this, but migraines especially because the vessels are dilated, that tends to cause migraines. It doesn’t have to be migraine. You can have other headaches that are related, but it’s usually migraines. Congestion or runny nose, we say if you’re eating something and your nose is running and it’s a high histamine food, you probably have a histamine intolerance. Low blood pressure can be pretty common. People that often feel dizzy or lightheaded, but then it’s like a higher heart rate actually. It’s called tachycardia.

Some people will be eating and like I said, this has happened to me before and their heart rate starts going faster and that’s something that the histamine buildup is doing in the body. Hives, but you don’t have to have hives to have histamine intolerance. I think people think you have to have hives where you don’t have… I’ve seen many people who’ve never had hives who have it. Flushing, if you’re someone who gets red the easily, whether it’s if you’re embarrassed to turn ride quickly or you work out and you get really red, and it’s like you don’t come back down to a normal color quickly, that’s a really big sign.

Vertigo is really common. Eczema is really, really common. Anxiety is really common. It can cause abnormalities in your menstrual cycle. It’s really so widespread the symptoms. But there a lot of people have a lot of them and some people just have one or two diarrhea, some people will tell me like I just randomly got diarrhea and that’s typically a histamine response as well.

Amy Medling:

If you’re somebody that really suffers with seasonal allergies, is that a slam dunk that you have histamine intolerance?

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes, it depends. I think that some people have like allergies, like they’re really like allergic to certain things that bloom in different times of the year, and that raises our histamine levels, but then they’re fine otherwise. That may not exactly be the same thing as someone who just has histamine intolerance in general. But yes, any time you can’t break down histamine, the way other people do, you typically have an intolerance to it.

Amy Medling:

You had mentioned, talking to your doctor about these symptoms and they don’t really know what to do with you. Let me ask you, if I were to go into my general practitioner’s office and say to him, “I think I have histamine intolerance,” and I remember doing this probably 10 years ago with gluten, “I think I’m gluten intolerant,” and I remember, they’d look at me with this real amused look on their face like… is this like the new gluten intolerance?

Dr. Becky Campbell:

I think so. Yes, I think it is because it’s… I don’t want to say the wrong thing here, but I think that there’s different types of doctors. There’s types of doctors who are very big into research and they’re very open to learning new things and there’s other types of doctors who learned what they learned in medical school and that’s as far as they’re really willing to go, and they’re closed off in thinking outside the box or whatever. I think it all depends on what type of person you’re seeing. But if you do go to a doctor who is open to learning new things, they probably have heard about this because it is being researched now.

This is getting out there and people are talking about it. But you’re always going to have those situations where you go to your doctor and they roll their eyes and say, “Diet has nothing to do with your health.” Some people literally are… many people tell me that their doctor told them, gluten is fine if you have a thyroid issue that’s ridiculous. We know that it’s not. So yes, I think this is the same thing. People are saying, “What are you talking about? There’s no such thing as histamine intolerance.” I’ve had many patients who tell me that their doctor said that.

Amy Medling:

It’s really upon us, I think as PCOS Divas to do the research, and thank you for writing your book because this gets us the tools that we need so that we can start advocating for ourselves. Of course, your book is all cited at the end of book with different resources and references. But I would love for you to just quickly go through your histamine intolerance quiz before we move forward. I think that gives listeners a little bit more of a sense of whether this might be something they’re dealing with.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes. I wanted to put together the things that I hear the most, and I know from having this myself what I suffer with the most, so it makes it easier for you to identify. These are just some of the things, and it doesn’t mean that you have to have all of them or even that you have to have any of them, but it’s mostly what I hear and see the most. I put a quiz in the book. The first question is, do you ever get fatigued after eating certain foods other than high sugar foods?

Because we know that, eating high sugar foods can definitely make you crash. So I wanted to know if you’re eating something else, like let’s say you eat an avocado, which is high in histamine, or you eat a pickle or whatever, something… We’ll go over the high histamine foods I’m sure in a minute, but I’m eating something that is not sugary. Do you feel tired after? That was definitely one of my biggest signs. Every time I ate something high histamine, I was exhausted. Almost like I took a sleeping pill.

Does your nose ever run while you’re eating certain foods? Like I said, that’s definitely a big sign. Do you suffer from vertigo or dizziness? Do you ever feel tightening in your throat after eating or even randomly? A lot of people do and they mistake that as a thyroid issue. A lot of times it’s not. It has more to do with histamine, and it can definitely be a thyroid issue, I don’t want to steer people away from that, but if you don’t have thyroid issues and a lot of these actually run hand in hand, believe it or not, but yes that’s something common I hear people say.

Do you have low blood pressure? You don’t have to have low blood pressure. You can actually have high blood pressure too. It’s just more common to have low blood pressure because of the dilated blood vessels, but you can definitely have the opposite. Do you suffer from migraine headaches? Do you have skin issues like eczema, dermatitis or psoriasis? Do you experience anxiety or panic attacks? I know before I got diagnosed I had panic attacks all the time and they were really… what was happening with me was I was feeling these symptoms and I didn’t know what they were. Especially when you have feelings of stuff crawling on your scalp, it can be pretty scary. I was getting panic attacks from my symptoms.

Also, in addition to that, you’re activating your sympathetic nervous system, and so that actually can cause… when that happens, like if you have stress, your cortisol raises, that activates your sympathetic nervous system and then that activates your muscles to release more histamine. So it’s this vicious cycle. Do you experience any unwanted symptoms after eating fermented foods because they tend to be the highest and histamine. Do you experience any unwanted symptoms after eating leftover foods? Because the longer food sits, the more histamine it produces and people think you can cook histamine out and you can’t, but you can freeze food. I teach you about how to do this in my book, how to freeze everything just so you can stop that histamine from being produced.

Then the last one was does your face get red easily and stay that way during or after workout? If you can identify with some of these are a lot of these, the chances of you having histamine intolerance are very high.

Amy Medling:

I wanted you to talk about the root cause, causes that you’ve outlined in your book or some of them as to why you might have histamine intolerance. I’m wondering about autoimmune issues. Like if you’re already predisposed to autoimmune, like you have Hashimoto’s, does that make you more predisposed to histamine intolerance?

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes, when I was doing the research for this book, I can tell you there aren’t a lot of articles, peer reviewed articles that show the relationship between histamine and thyroid. But there was some, and they are in the reference section of my book and I did create a chart because I have both of these things and I see many patients who have both. I was like, I know that there is a connection here so I really wanted to learn about that.

This is how it works, with hypothyroidism, which is too little thyroid hormone, you’re going to get an increase in mast cell production and which is going to increase your histamine production. Then if you add in something like a DAO enzyme, that enzyme that breaks down histamine, if you add in that genetic mutation or just a decrease in that enzyme, you’re going to have histamine intolerance. Then I was able to actually find a study that showed the link between histamine intolerance and the development of autoimmune disorders. It’s like one causes the other, it’s this vicious cycle.

Then with hyperthyroidism, a lot of us don’t talk about hyperthyroidism. I know my thyroid people always get upset. They are like, “What about us hyperthyroid people?” With hyperthyroidism it’s almost the same mechanism, just a little bit different. It actually increases the histamine receptors that you have. Then that increases the response to histamine in the body and then back into the histamine intolerance, and back into the development of autoimmune disorders.

Amy Medling:

Yes, that’s really interesting. A lot of women with PCOS have autoimmune thyroid issues. If you’re experiencing some of these symptoms, or if that quiz if you answered, more than a couple, you have to get this book. Why don’t you tell us some of the other root factors. I think women with PCOS unfortunately, we already sort of have the chips against us in terms of hormonal balance. Yes, so go ahead, Dr. Becky.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

I think that the leading causes mast cell activation syndrome, and I know most people don’t know at all what that is. Mast cell activation syndrome and histamine intolerance present pretty much the same. Those with mast cell activation syndrome have a histamine intolerance, but here’s the difference. Remember how I talked about histamine being released because your immune system is trying to fight off some type of pathogen? That is the normal role of histamine in the body. While with mast cell activation syndrome, you’re going to get act abnormal activation of the immune system.

Let me give you an example. Let’s say, remember I told you I used to pass out in the heat a lot, so with those with mast cell activation syndrome, something like weather, whether it’s to being cold or hot, can make your body start releasing a bunch of histamine and it sees that whether as a threat. The same way that it would have seen the virus as a threat, but it’s really not a threat. That can happen with almost 200 different things… not 200 different…

Amy Medling:

No, that’s so interesting because yesterday I posted a video, an infographic article about seasonal affective disorder and some of the comments that I was getting on social media, some women were saying that, “You know what, I don’t really have a hard time in the Winter. It’s the Summer that I’m really having a hard time with.”

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes. People will say they’re allergic to the sun, and it’s because the heat… well, for one, heat on your body, makes you release histamine. Number two, if you have mast cell activation syndrome, like I said, there’s about 200 different triggers. So abnormal things that would not be normally seen as a threat by the immune system are causing your body to act like there was a threat in your immune system and release these inflammatory cytokines and histamine is one of them.

Amy Medling:

The mass cell activation is the major factor, but you talk about some other factors as well.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes. Leaky gut, we all talk about leaky gut a lot. Leaky gut is a real thing, and I think there’s a lot of debate on whether it is or not, but it definitely is. Leaky gut causes a lot of inflammation in the body. Inflammation causes an increase in histamine, number one. That’s where this is tied in, but also leaky gut can really decrease that DAO enzyme. Like I said, there’s different reasons. Either it’s like a genetic factor that you’re not releasing as much DAO as you should or it’s something like the thing is I’m going to go through right now that are actually decreasing the enzyme itself. Leaky gut is one of those things.

But then also gut bacteria, we want good gut bacteria, but we don’t want opportunistic bacteria. Some of that opportunistic bacteria increases histamine and increases inflammation in the gut. So that is going to be again, if you can’t break down the histamine properly, that’s going to be a problem. Also, the primary place that DAO is produced is in the gut. So if you have an unhealthy gut microbiome, you’re not going to have proper levels of that DAO enzyme. That’s why the number one thing besides diet that I do… well, besides diet and liver support that I do with my patients with histamine intolerance, is I go straight to the gut and I test to see what’s going on in there and then we work to support that accordingly. Because that can make a huge difference.

Like you can clean up your gut and you can tolerate so many more foods, and that’s obviously… the whole purpose of what I do is to not put you on a restrictive diet for the rest of your life. It’s to get you to live as normal life as possible. Feel the best that you can, eat as many foods as you can. But obviously we’re always going to want to keep foods that are going to cause inflammation out of your body, but some of the high histamine foods are really nutrient dense. I want you to be able to eat some of these foods again. That’s why we work on these underlying causes.

Amy Medling:

I was just going to say, speaking of the high histamine foods, you sort of tell us what those foods are?

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Okay, so fermented foods cause a histamine producing bacteria. That’s why they’re so high in histamine. We talked a little bit about leftovers and that whole thing. Leftovers, avocado unfortunately, everyone’s going to cry when they hear that because everyone loves avocado, some citrus fruits. Sometimes people can do okay with a lemon or a lime and not oranges. I have a yes, no, and maybe list, because I want you to try some of the foods in the maybe list to see how you do, and I’m just having you eliminate the biggest offenders at first.

Amy Medling:

What about carrots? I’m just curious because my son cannot eat raw carrots.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

No, they don’t. They don’t tend to be high in histamine.

Amy Medling:

Oh, okay.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes, that can just be an actual food sensitivity. Strawberries, tomato, bananas, eggplants, spinach really most vegetables are okay, which is good, but eggplants and bananas tend to be an issue. Alcohol, especially red wine, even white wine, but red is worse and like beer or champagne those types of things. Some nuts are higher in histamine than others. Like cashews and walnuts are really high in histamine. Vinegars, there are… I do talk about vinegar in detail in the book.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

There are some vinegars that are okay, and I give recipes with those vinegars because it’s hard to eat a salad if you can’t eat lemon, make a dressing on a lemon or vinegar. Then even some spices like cinnamon, curry can be an issue. Some people don’t do well with paprika and some people are so severe they can’t have any dried herbs. They have to use everything fresh. This is like things that I teach you how to experiment with in the book. But those are the biggest hitters I’d say, is the stuff I named.

Amy Medling:

Can you see crossover on food sensitivity panels, those foods that you might be sensitive to? Could it be because of histamine? Because I’m thinking about my husband, cinnamon is really high on his list as well as anything with brewer’s yeast or baker’s yeast. So that’s the vinegars the wine.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Right, exactly. Yes.

Amy Medling:

How do you know whether it’s a true sensitivity versus a histamine food that you’re reacting to?

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Well, to be honest with you, I used to do a food sensitivity test and all of my patients in the very beginning, and then I realized that most food sensitivities come from gut issues. Especially leaky gut, because your body just starts targeting everything else like an invader and just responding with inflammation once your gut gets really leaky. Instead of doing that, I started treating the gut first and then I would see if they were still having food issues, then I would do a food sensitivity panel, and almost never have to because I can figure it out.

With histamine intolerance I have everyone and whether they’re just doing the book or they’re our patient, I have them keep really thorough daily food trackers. So I want you to write down like everything are eating and your symptoms and you tend to see like a pattern. If you’re seeing it with these histamine foods, it’s a histamine intolerance, you know that. Then if your gut is really, really healthy and you’re still having a reaction to other foods that aren’t high histamine, then that’s really a true food sensitivity.

Amy Medling:

That makes sense. One of the steps in your book is to heal your liver or love your liver. Women with PCOS are at higher risk for a fatty liver. I’m wondering if that comes into play with histamine intolerance?

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Well, I think that one of the jobs of your liver is to help balance hormones. If you have some issues going on with your liver, which most of us do, if you haven’t supported your liver, because of everything we’re taking in, whether we’re told we’re putting on our skin, the makeup we’re using, the skincare we’re using, the stuff we’re cleaning our house with so many people who wear perfume.

Those things are raising our estrogen, and then if our liver’s congested, we can’t clear that estrogen out properly. I think that that is a big place that the liver plays a role with PCOS, because we know with PCOS you have these imbalances in hormones more so than some other people might. I think that that’s probably the biggest place that those two connect.

Amy Medling:

You have some really great tips in your book about supporting your liver. I was hoping maybe you could give us a couple.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes. I personally take liver support via a supplement every day. I’m very busy, some of these things can take time, a lot of time to do. I wanted to give options though for people based on different budgets, or just what you like. There’s obviously supplements… I have a supplement on my line called Liver Love that I think in this, it’s an amazing supplement, but you don’t have to do it that way. You can do Epsom salt baths. They’re really helpful for detoxification support.

Castor oil packs can be really effective. I remember when I was really, really sick, about two years ago maybe at this point with living in mold and I did not know. Mold is one of the biggest triggers for a mass activation, so obviously I was just dumping tons of histamine and I couldn’t tolerate a supplement at all, any supplements. This is what happens with people who are really, really bad with this. I started using castor oil packs over my liver and it really helped me. It was what really made me able to get up and start moving and functioning and then able to start taking supplements and doing things that would help me pull the mold out and all that stuff.

Then infrared saunas, those can be really good too. The only thing I say with infrared saunas is to be careful if you have like an eczema flare, you would not want to get into an infrared sauna at that point because it can actually make it worse. Also some people who just don’t do well with heat at all would not want to do the sauna. Dry brushing is something I didn’t put in the book, but that’s another thing that really can be good because your body uses your skin to detox if your liver is not doing its job. But again, if you have like eczema on your arms, you’re not going to want them to be dry brushing that area.

Amy Medling:

You’ve given us like a lot of great tips. I know that the supplement that I like for liver support is an N-acetylcysteine that I offer on my store. For those that aren’t familiar with castor oil packs, there’s a lot of content on pcosdiva.com that we put up in the last year about Castro oil. Check that out. I have a podcast with Dr. Marisol Teijeiro as well.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes, she’s great. I love her.

Amy Medling:

Yes, The Queen of Thrones. If you want more information on that, I think castor oil packs are great.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes, it really, really helped me. Because some people can’t… if you have mass cell activation syndrome, you can be so sensitive to the very things you need for treatment and have to have this really gentle place to start. That’s where I will start people because like I said, it was the only thing I could tolerate at the time living in that mold.

Again, I didn’t know I was in mold, so I was trying to figure out what was wrong. Nothing was coming up on my testing and I couldn’t understand what’s happening, but I knew that I needed to support my liver. There was something there, and so that really made the big difference. I would just lay there for about 45 minutes with the castor oil pack over my liver and it really, really helped me.

Amy Medling:

Yes, and it’s relaxing too.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

It is very relaxing. I tell people a try it once during the day and once at night because you may be the type of person that gets energy from it and you may be the type of person that that gets tired. So you have to figure out your good time of day to do it.

Amy Medling:

If you were listening and some of those symptoms sounds like you, I really recommend that you pick up a copy of Dr. Becky’s book, Dr. Becky Campbell, the 4-Phase Histamine Reset Plan. We’ll put a link to the book on Amazon in the show notes and also check out drbeckycampbell.com. Tell us what resources you have on your site and also people want to work with you, how can they do that?

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes. I’ve written some many articles, whether it be on thyroid health, the gut and or histamine. You go to health topics and there’s tons of stuff. I have a lot of resources on there. Then I actually can give you guys… I have a histamine guide that it gives you an infographic of the foods, the highest histamine foods, and of the symptoms associated with histamine intolerance. It’s a very good way to home test yourself to see if you have histamine intolerance. You basically eat those foods, see if your symptoms get worse or if you get new symptoms, and then you take those foods away for a week or two and see if you feel better, and if you do, then you have histamine intolerance.

Amy Medling:

Oh fantastic.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes. I’ll give you a link to that. Then I work with people virtually, so I work with people all over the world. We talk, I do a really thorough history and I do testing based on what I hear from our first consultation and then based on whatever the testing says we just start working to support the body.

Amy Medling:

Great, and they can contact you through a contact form on your site?

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes. On my website it says set up a consultation. You can do it yourself, and on my Instagram in my bio there is a clickable link too, so yes.

Amy Medling:

Perfect. I know you have a great Instagram handle, page as well. It’s a lot of fun. Tell us about it.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes, I like to dance. It’s @drbeckycampbell and I just… I’m not a very serious person. I do love to educate people, but I’m also super goofy, and I dance 24 hours a day around my house. So you will see all sorts of stuff on there. You’ll see videos of me cooking, you’ll see videos of me dancing and telling you what something is. You’ll see me talking seriously about… I really like to answer people’s questions. I take requests for questions, then I make videos answering questions so people can figure out what’s going on. So yes, I try to mix it up and keep it interesting on there.

Amy Medling:

We’re going to post that infographic in the show notes and we always transcribe all of the podcasts, so be sure to check back at pcosdiva.com for all of that information. But thank you so much Dr. Becky for coming back on and congratulations on your new book and thanks for educating everyone about histamine. This is so valuable.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Well, thanks so much for having me back. I love to educate people on this because not enough people are talking about it. So thank you for letting me do that.

Amy Medling:

Yes, and hopefully, our doctors won’t look at us with like the deer in the headlights, after a while, because of the work that you’ve done.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes, it’s crazy. I was talking to someone in… where were they, it wasn’t Amsterdam, it was somewhere over there though, Belgium. It was someone in Belgium. He said, “Oh, my doctor in a doctor’s office in Belgium gave me your book.” And I was like, what? I thought that was pretty cool.

Amy Medling:

That’s so cool.

Dr. Becky Campbell:

Yes, so I guess the word is getting out.

Amy Medling:

Yes. Well, thank you for your time and thank you everyone for taking the time to listen to this podcast. I look forward to being with you very soon. Bye, bye.

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Making the Connection: PCOS and Magnesium Deficiency, Heart Disease, Inflammation & Insulin

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