The Opportunity in Your Diagnosis [Podcast with Stacey Robbins] - PCOS Diva
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The Opportunity in Your Diagnosis [Podcast with Stacey Robbins]

PCOS Podcast 146 - Stacey Robbins

“I was looking for the perfect pill, the perfect doctor, the perfect diet, the perfect solution. And I was looking for someone else to be the grownup in the room, someone else to be the hero who was going to save me, someone else who’s going to be a better friend to me. And … I realized I am the one, I am the one who’s going to save me from this.” – Stacey Robbins

Stacey Robbins is an inspiration. I love her sense of humor and sage approach to illness, healing, aging, and life in general. She encourages us to use every circumstance, including a diagnosis, to transform our victim mindset, rediscover our sense of humor, and learn to love ourselves again. Listen in (or read the transcript) as we discuss her journey through PCOS and Hashimoto’s, extreme weight gain and loss, healing, and finding the path to loving herself. Many of us will find commonality with her as she describes how it took her diagnosis to convince her to listen to her body, seize the opportunity, and heal from the soul out. No matter where you are in your journey, you owe it to yourself to hear her wisdom about how to heal and truly thrive.

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[Complete Transcript Below]

Mentioned in this podcast:

Complete Transcript:

Amy:

Today’s podcast’s guest is Stacey Robbins. She is a soulful storyteller and a key influencer in the global conversation on healing your life through Hashimoto’s. Her award winning book, You’re Not Crazy and You’re Not Alone is filled with hilarious, honest, and heart aching moments along the journey of doctors telling her her symptoms were all in her head, to telling her a year and a half later to get her affairs in order. Stacey holds nothing back as she weaves her heroic tale, and playfully inspires women from all walks of life to see what we can use in every circumstance, including a diagnosis, as a way to transform our victim mindset, rediscover our sense of humor, and to learn to love ourselves again.

Welcome to the PCOS Diva Podcast, Stacey.

Stacey Robbins:

Thank you for having me, Amy. I love the work you’re doing, and I know your community, and so appreciative. So thanks for including me today.

Amy:

Oh, thanks Stacey. I know we met about four years ago at a conference. And since then, I’ve read several of your books, and I’ve followed you on social media, and you always have so much wisdom to share. And I just felt like the time was right to have you share that wisdom with PCOS Diva, because I think the Hashimoto’s journey often parallels PCOS, and incidentally, a lot of women with PCOS also has Hashimoto’s. I’m really just looking forward to our conversation today.

Stacey Robbins:

Me too. And I was diagnosed with both, PCOS and Hashimoto’s.

Amy:

Oh, I didn’t realize that. Okay.

Stacey Robbins:

Yeah, it does. We had talked about that, that day a little bit, but we had so many people we were meeting.

Amy:

Yeah, they often come in tandem with women with PCOS. I’m actually working on an article now about auto-immune and PCOS. And it seems like once you open yourself up to one of those autoimmune conditions, that you are at higher risk to developing more. But I think you and I both can agree that if you work on some of these mindset shifts, it can make such a big difference.

Stacey Robbins:

Yeah. I think that for me, when your body changes so drastically, as mine did … I went from being the sexy, curvy professional musician, who was on the stage all the time, and I had a lot of attention, and my looks were part of my career, in the music career. When you go from being in that place where you feel really capable and in control, or at least able to pretend that you’re in control because you can dress yourself up, even if your life isn’t perfect on the back end. But you can pull it all together, and be on a stage, and make something happen that’s great for other people.

And then to go from that, to being over 100 pounds more within a very short period of time. I mean, I felt like not me, and people related to me so differently. And it was a really hard thing because I just wanted my body to be back to its old ways so I could do the things I used to do, and pretend in the ways that I used to pretend. But what happened was when my body was not allowing me to force my will upon it, and it wasn’t complying. No matter how little I ate or how much I exercised, my face was still round like a moon, and my body was still laden with cellulite and all these extra, over 100 pounds. The work that I had to do, I was forced to do, was going inside though.

I was forced to go into mindset stuff, because the physical, the superficial just wasn’t bowing to my desire for it to be the old ways. So yeah, I had to go in, I had to go up into my head, I had to go into my heart, and I had to look at what mindsets I had that maybe I was masquerading or I wasn’t noticing because I was so busy, just being busy, and living a life that had performance, not just on a stage, but in my life, in my relationships, and with myself. And I think that what happened was in my old life, where I was a workaholic and performing all the time, I think that I got very uncomfortable with being quiet and alone with myself.

And the minute that I would have to face the things that I thought in my head, I would just get up and get busy again. I’d clean something, or I’d create a new business, or I’d work on a new song. And Hashimoto’s forced me, not just because I was fat, but because I had lost my energy, and I was in so much pain with the myalgias, that I had to sit down, and I had to be alone with me, and I had to see the way my thoughts processed and my beliefs were. And so, yeah. It was profound for me noticing how my mindsets were bent towards unworthiness, my beliefs were bent towards, “I’m rejectable, I’m unlovable, I have to perform for my worth. If you like me, then I think better of myself. If you don’t like me, then I would be devastated.” A lot of fears of rejection.

So, I don’t think I noticed that in the same ways until Hashimoto’s showed up in my life. And the last thing I’ll say about that before you jump back in, is I think that I just wanted to believe that it was I didn’t realize how devastated, and devastating my thoughts were, and how much they were damaging my life and health. And the thing is that I really so wanted to be skinny again, and I so wanted Hashimoto’s to go away, that I ended up having to shift even my mindset about Hashimoto’s, wishing it away, and waiting for my life to be different.

And I really had to welcome the message it was bringing into my life, which was, “Slow down, pay attention. It’s time to heal some things at a soul level, that you need to work on so that you can live the life you’re really here to live.” So, that was my opportunity, hiding in Hashimoto’s.

Amy:

Yeah. I love that. And as I’m listening to you, I hear so many parallels of my story. I know I used to feel like my body had betrayed me. The PCOS symptoms that I was having, I felt like I had to reclaim my femininity, because I didn’t really feel feminine anymore. And anyway, I ultimately realized that PCOS was a wakeup call because I didn’t have a lot of balance in my life. I found that I did everything for everybody else, but always put myself last on the list. So that was my realization. And once I started to create more balance and put my needs … put the oxygen mask on first, I saw that my symptoms started to subside, and I knew I was onto something.

So, I’m curious if you had a similar experience, that as you started to work on some of these issues, did the Hashimoto’s symptoms start to subside?

Stacey Robbins:

It’s really an interesting question because I do think it all worked together, meaning that as I did have to work on mindset things, as I did work on, “Well, what is going on in my body?” And at that time, 23 years ago, the doctors said, “We don’t know what’s going on in your body. We just know that you have it.” And I was like, “Well, what is my body doing?” And they told me that my body was rejecting my thyroid. Now, I know there are different thoughts on that right now, and different takes on that, but I’m just going to share with you what it was then.

For the perfectionist in me, I have to say this, and the OCD person in me, I’m always looking for, “Wait, what’s the ultimate truth? What’s the highest truth?” When very often life is really just about what is being revealed to you in this moment, and going with that. And so I’m going to share with you what I went with 23 years ago, and I wrote in my book, You’re Not Crazy and You’re Not Alone, is they told me my body was rejecting my thyroid and attacking my thyroid. I sat with that contemplation, and I said, “Where am I rejecting me? Where am I not at peace with me? Where am I attacking me? Where am I not a friend to me?”

And I do think that in the contemplation of that, what happens is we are able to recognize behaviors that we were formerly just distracting ourselves from. And in the recognition, a lot of that disappears. And what happens is I then took different actions toward loving myself, meaning I would go to a doctor who could truly help me, instead of the ones who all told me I was crazy. I tried nutrition, I changed my foods. So I think what happens is when you start thinking higher thoughts, you start taking higher actions that honor those higher thoughts. And in that way, yes, I think that my body then started standing down because there was alignment between …

There was an alignment before. I was thinking crazy thoughts, and I ended up with some crazy health. And I lived a pretty crazy demanding life, and I ended up with some chronic health things at that time. And so there was alignment, and then that got revealed, and I needed to shift my mindset, and create some new alignment. And yes, I even did … just to answer your question on this. This was fabulous. I was hunting around because I had this personal commitment, prayer, meditation, whatever word feels good for you. But for me, I just said, “I don’t want to trim weeds anymore. I want to pull this up by the roots.” And so I remember having a book come across my way in 1998 or ’99, and it was about the spiritual roots to physical disease.

And I was like, “Oh, that’s really speaking my language.” And I read the book, and I went to this place for two weeks to work on those things. And as I did work on mindset spirituality, even though I didn’t believe in all of that particular version of spirituality, I was willing to engage in the conversation within myself. And I came back, and truly, I was told I would never have children if I did live. I came back, and my endocrinologist, who is the head of endocrinology at the UCLA, he said to me, “I can’t believe this. I’ve never had to lower someone’s medicine before.” They lowered my medicine over and over with my thyroid medicine, and I ended up becoming pregnant nine months after being there at that place, naturally.

Am I saying that’s everybody’s story? Am I saying that’s the ultimate prescription? No, but I followed what was in my heart, and I did find that my body then did have different changes. Not completely done, but different. And, yes. So I do see a connection.

Amy:

This is tweetable. I think you said, “If you think higher thoughts, then you take higher action.” I love that, and I think that’s so true. And you talk nutrition, and that’s why I push nutrition so much on PCOS Diva, because I think that when you feed yourself, it’s not just thinking the higher thoughts. When you feed yourself better food, then I think you take higher action as well. That’s just something that came to mind.

Stacey Robbins:

Agreed. I think food is vibration. I think when I eat processed foods, it supports my processed thoughts. And I think when I eat really fresh, vibrant, organic, non-corrupted foods, really highly mineralized foods, I vibrate with that, and I think more organic, original, independent, not rebellious to myself, against myself, kind of thoughts. And I do see a connection, actually.

Amy:

Yeah, and so many women that I encounter feel cheated because they can’t eat like their friends. They’ve got this PCOS diagnosis, and they can’t go drink beer, and eat pizza, and have ice cream, and not affect them. And I always say, “Nobody gets a free pass.” So when you think about food on a vibrational level, like you just described, I think that really helps you to realize that nobody’s winning with those processed foods. Not to say that you can ever have them, but eating foods that are full of nutrients and minerals definitely make you feel better inside and out.

Stacey Robbins:

It really does. And I understand that process you and I have both gone through in our own ways, that sense of loss, because food is … And I talked about this in my book. Food is not just food. Food is connection to culture, to history, to celebrations, to mourning, to comfort, to so many things. And so it really is a process to do that surgery of, “What has food been to me, and how do I still maintain the most vibrant parts of the connection with my community and celebrations, or even the expression of mourning, and yet not undo myself because apparently my body is calling for restraint during this time, and restraint in some foods?”

But that doesn’t mean that I have to not be connected to the vitality of life and family. But it changes. So I had to walk through that, because that’s a big deal as an Italian girl from New Jersey, where food is around every corner, and it’s part of every comfort, “Oh, you fell down out of the tree, here’s a cookie, here’s a biscotti, let’s have some hot cocoa.” It was so connected to love that it took a lot of work inside of me to be willing to give up gluten. It took like a year and a half to give up gluten. I’ve been gluten-free for nine years now, but it took a little while to get there. So I get it.

Amy:

So I just have to ask, you’re being an Italian, gluten had to have been a huge part of your life. How do you get that fix of like al dente pasta or Italian cookie, and still be gluten free?

Stacey Robbins:

Yeah, that’s a great question, and I lead retreats in Italy every year. And so I go back to where my family is from, and I have women from all over fly in, and I create a gluten-free retreat for them. First of all, I want to say this about myself. I can live in austerity, I can live in asceticism, where I’ve removed so many things. I’ve already proven that to myself. And so to be able to embrace like the gluten-free cannoli, and yes, it’s going to have some dairy filling, and I weigh all the time like, “What is this going to give to me, and what is this going to cost me?” I’m uncompromised about the gluten. So I have places where I’m 100%, “I will not compromise on this.”

And so I do find those gluten-free fixes. Sometimes I’ll do those zucchini noodles, and I’ll do all the same … Really what I love is the sauciness of things, I love sauces. So I’ll find a way to make a cashew nut, Alfredo-style sauce with vegan cheese, and all of those yummy flavors, and that’ll work for me. Or just the other day, I made a lovely chickpea gluten-free pasta. I normally do grain-free, but I do get that craving sometime. And I’m finding in perimenopause, since I’m here right now, I’m finding that I want some of those comfort foods. And then in the season that we’re in with all things Corona virus, comfort foods sound good too.

But I don’t overindulge, but when I do want to grab something, I’ll make a gluten-free almond cookie that’s similar to something I know in Italy. But honestly, after time, your cravings change. But when you do have them, do them in a way that honors the things you care about. Because honestly, energy started becoming my highest priority. Having good energy meant I could live my dreams, meant I had a clear mind. And so when I look at food, I don’t look at it like it has to be my best friend. It has to give me energy, and I also want it to be pleasurable while I enjoy it. So I try to make sure that I value my energy as I choose my foods, and I make those high energy foods pleasurable.

Amy:

Oh, that’s a great answer. Yeah. I mean, energy is that commodity that I’m looking forward to, and I know that certain choices that I make in the food I eat means that I’m going to be on the sofa ready for a snooze at three o’clock. So yeah, I think that’s a great way to approach making your food choices. So you mentioned being prone to perfectionism and OCD. And in my work, I’ve found that most women that are really struggling with PCOS are caught up in that perfectionism trap. And I would love for you to speak to perfectionism, and how you’ve been able to manage that in your life.

Stacey Robbins:

Hmm. So when you can perform in a way that meets your perfectionistic desires, then you don’t really notice that you’re perfectionistic in the same way. But as soon as there was this gap between what I wanted to be able to do, and then what I couldn’t do because the Hashimoto’s wouldn’t let me, I really had to look at why I was perfectionistic. And there’s a lot of fear that’s behind that, and there’s a lot of self-judgment, and whatever you think other people think about you, the way you value the way other people think about you. There was a lot of that tied to that for me. I also had to understand that I have an eye for beauty, I do have an eye for beautiful things.

And sometimes that line between, “I appreciate beauty,” and I need it to be perfect so that I’m not rejected, that sometimes that line can get really blurry, and then sometimes we feel like we have to give up something being beautiful or good just because we have a hang-up and some attachment about it. And I think, again, the mindset stuff helps us to do the surgery, noticing where we’re getting perfectionistic. Does that plate of food have to be plated perfectly? Does the house have to look perfect when somebody comes in? What do I value most? Having to prioritize where I was going to spend my energy.

Again, it’s about energy because I might’ve had only an hour of good energy in a 24-hour day when I was at my worst with Hashimoto’s. So was I going to spend my energy making the place look perfect? I had to prioritize. And so I think that as a coach, I coached so many women for the last two and a half decades, the question always is what really matters most and why? And when you can ask yourself, “Why does it matter that that’s perfect?” I remember when I was doing one of my CDs in the studio, my producer came to me, and he said, “I’m going to hand you this disc.” He said, “I know you.” He said, “You like things 100% a certain way.”

He said, “But you’re going to have to settle for 80% because that’s the budget you have.” I think I could spend $20,000 at the time, and that was like 20 years ago, or whatever it was. And that was a lot of money, it was still good. But he’s like, “You got to know we’re not pulling out all the stops to fix everything and make everything perfect.” And I think even just the preparation of him saying that allowed me to be in that space of okayness, and that 80% …. I had one person who said to me once, one colleague of mine said, “By the way Stacey, I just want you to know your 10% is more than most people’s 100%.”

So, I have to realize that my measurement is just a little bit different than other people. So it’s a lot of recognition, it’s a lot of talking to yourself, asking yourself valuable questions like, “What is the priority, and where should my energy go most, and what matters most? Well, does it matter more that everything’s cleaned in my house when my girlfriend comes over, or does it matter that she feels loved? What will make her feel loved? Well, if I have a pot of tea going, not if all the blinds are cleaned from the dust.” You know what I mean?

Amy:

Yeah, and I enjoy reading your vignettes in your book. I picked up the copy of your latest, An Unconventional Life: Where Messes and Magic Collide. I love that, that title. And just your stories about you and your husband and your relationship, it seems like the two of you have a really good balance. And that’s how I think of my relationship with my husband, especially when it comes to my perfection because he always calls me out on it. And he says that he’s like the 90% guy, especially when it comes to doing things around the house. He just put in a patio, and I was going down there, and I saw all of the flaws right away.

But he has to remind me, “Hey, I’m the 90% guy, and if that’s good enough for me, it’s good enough for you.” And I think it’s training ourselves to see what is right, like you said with your friend, with the pot of tea. That’s what’s right about the visit. It doesn’t have to be that your whole kitchen is sparkling clean. So helping to train me to look for what is right, right away, rather than what is wrong has helped me overcome the perfectionism. I guess that’s just one of my tips.

Stacey Robbins:

I love that. That’s a great tip, and so true. We do that with children. We don’t want to come in and pick every piece of lint off their shirt, and move their hair away from their face. We want to hear their hearts.

Amy:

But you have to apply that to yourself. So when you look at yourself in the mirror … I mean, you have a whole chapter talking about cellulite, which is hilarious. And that’s something that we as women, that’s the first thing we see, right? We don’t see the beautiful curves, and the healthy glow to our skin, and the beautiful lips, or what have you. We only see our flaws, or that’s what we see first. So I’m curious, how did you come to a sense of peace with your body after you felt like Hashimoto’s hijacked it? And I think that that feeling of a health condition hijacking your body, really women with PCOS can relate to. And I’d love to hear how you were able to move beyond that.

Stacey Robbins:

Hmm. Yeah, I think that’s still a journey. I’ll be honest. I think that I’ve lost over 100 pounds since I gained over that 100 pounds, but it’s different. It’s different a couple decades later. It’s different going through perimenopause, it’s different after having two children. So I think that the conversation still gives me the opportunity, my body still gives me the opportunity to remain in the conversation, and take it to the next level. I think at first, like you said, Amy, I felt betrayed. I was like, “Why will you not comply?” I was going to be just this militant person, with my head commanding my body what to do, and it didn’t fall into line.

And so I denied it more and more and more. And I saw that that’s what I did. I either went through denial, or I gave my body access. And I saw that, like you said, there was no balance there. And so the journey had to become … for me, it was progressive, it was progressive to shift from resentment to gratitude. It was a process of me … At one point my dad, who was a very handsome man, and a very active man, and just very good at business, and all the things that he did, he had to have his legs amputated because of the complications to his health issue before he died.

And I remember thinking, “These thighs that I’m complaining about, these legs and I’m complaining about, I love to walk. I get to walk everywhere. I get to walk for miles a day in Italy, and my dad didn’t get to have that.” And so I’m not saying we always compare or find gratitude through comparison, but I do think that sometimes people being close to us and in harder or different situations can serve as a reminder to shift to gratitude. But I did just start the practice at some point of grabbing my breasts, my saggy breasts that had the stretch marks on them.

And I’d stand in the mirror and go, “Thank you, thank you for nursing my boys.” I’d grab my thighs, jiggly, wiggly, whatever, and I’d say, “Thank you, thank you so much for taking me so many places. Thanks for hanging in there.” And I’d put my hand over my liver, and I talk to my liver, and I thank it. I’d thank what I could see, and thank what I couldn’t. And I just do think that an atmosphere of being grateful, like what you said of when your husband makes the deck, looking at what is there, instead of what’s not right, I think can help shift our view about it. And that’s what I’m doing.

My body is different, and my body was going to change anyway. I think I’m going through what many people go through probably in their 80s, 70s or 80s, when their body changes. But I’ve just got the opportunity to address those issues earlier.

Amy:

So one thing that I wanted to comment is I’m sure you’re familiar with the work of that Japanese scientist, Emoto.

Stacey Robbins:

Dr. Emoto, yeah.

Amy:

Yeah, and the way that he would talk to water, and the crystal, and the vibration, I’m sure if you could measure the vibration of the water. I mean, just think if we could all go through that ritual every day in the mirror, and thanking those body parts that we might not give enough love to, what that would do for changing the frequency and vibration of our bodies.

Stacey Robbins:

Absolutely. Oh my gosh, I love Dr. Emoto. I introduced my kids to him years ago, and I want to say this too. Because I think that so many of us get into a when and then with our bodies, like, “When it reaches this number on the scale,” or, “When it can fit into these jeans,” or “When my butt gets perkier,” or whatever is our standard of achievement, we then reward ourselves with love. And I think that that is probably one of the most dangerous things that we do to ourselves, and we do to each other as a result of doing it to ourselves, is that we wait to love ourselves.

And the journey for me had to be … I realized this because my husband and I went through a really hard time in the beginning of our marriage with something he was going through. We got married young, and he was walking through something that was a surprise to me, and I didn’t know about, but I was committed. And it was really painful and hard those first seven years. But I realized at some point, if I have him just perform and do all the right things for me, when he does those, I become the manager of him, and his love isn’t free, and he will never trust my love.

And that’s when I wrote this sentence, “Love is a wonderful inspiration, but it’s a terrible reward.” And I started going around the country, giving a talk called Loving the Unfinished Places. And there is something about when we apply love to the unfinished places, that is what allows them to be at their best, and give them their best opportunity to change.

Amy:

Oh, that’s beautiful. Yeah, that’s beautiful. I want to read just a quick little excerpt from your book, An Unconventional Life. You’d be talking about attending, I think a yoga class, and you said, “I attended a class years ago, and someone asked me, ‘What would you do if you were at your goal weight?’ I got that weird faraway look in my eyes like I was talking about a unicorn or something. And you said, ‘I’d wear cute clothes, laugh without worrying about a double or triple chin appearing. And I’d dance with my kids without worrying about the size of my butt.’ And then the teacher said to me, ‘The secret to getting there is doing that stuff now, live your life now. Don’t wait for your idea of perfect in order to live a self-expressed life.'”

Stacey Robbins:

Mm-hmm. Isn’t that juicy?

Amy:

I know, it really is. Why don’t you comment on that?

Stacey Robbins:

Sure. Yeah, and it’s so funny because I’m just walking through that this week with … I’m doing a weight loss workshop for my girlfriends with Hashimoto’s. And I just talked about that yesterday, that loves starts now. That’s a big deal. And so really what we think is the goal is actually the prescription. And I asked my ladies in my group, and I’ll ask it to all of us, is like, “How would you feel if you were where you wanted to be in your health or weight or whatever it is?” And whatever those feelings are, three to five feelings, I had them write it down. And I said, “And what would you be doing?” And they wrote them down.

And I said, “That’s the pathway to get there? Wear those cute clothes now. Laugh now, dance now.” For me, my feelings, my three feelings I wanted to feel if I had lost weight, was I want to feel happy, peaceful, and free. That’s how I would feel, happy, peaceful, and free. And it’s like, “Then do that now. Don’t wait for a number on the scale, and don’t wait for a certain size on your jeans. Just don’t wait for a certain number in your bank account, or for your spouse to be perfect, or whatever, your kids to behave. Live your joy now.” And that’s what had me start traveling to Italy, even though I wasn’t the perfect weight.

I thought, “I don’t want to have a retirement mentality about loving me. I don’t want to wait for a certain day on the calendar,” or like I said, “A number on the scale, to love me.” So that’s really what I’ve aimed to live by, not always doing it perfectly, but definitely doing it more consciously. And it’s made a big difference.

Amy:

Well, and Stacey, thank you so much for sharing your journey with us and the wisdom that you’ve found along the way. It’s been such a gift to me to be a little spectator. And so this is one reason I’m glad for social media. Social media can be such a curse, but to be able to see your posts, they always give me a little lift. So, thank you for that. I love that idea of thinking about three emotions of what that would feel like, and I really challenge everybody to think of what would you do if you felt good again? If you were living your best life, what would that feel like to you?

And really bring those three emotions to mind, and write them down. And as Stacey said, “Start living as if now, because that’s where the magic happens.” And I say this all the time that there is no magic pill for PCOS, you are the magic pill, the magic wand. And this is just one of those little tips and tricks on how to wield the wand, I guess.

Stacey Robbins:

Yes. And I say the same thing, I say, “I was looking for the perfect pill, the perfect doctor, the perfect diet, the perfect solution. And I was looking for someone else to be the grownup in the room, someone else to be the hero, who was going to save me, someone else who’s going to be a better friend to me. And I remember scanning room after room, and doctor’s office after doctor’s office until my hands, that were sitting on my lap, my eyes fell on my hands in my lap, and I realized I am the one, I am the one who’s going to save me from this.” I am 100% responsible. This is my mantra, my personal mantra. I am 100% responsible for my life, health, happiness, and peace.

Amy:

Hmm. You’re the heroine of your story.

Stacey Robbins:

I am, or I’m working on it. I’m making my cape.

Amy:

Well, Stacey, tell us where we could find out more about your work and what you offer to women?

Stacey Robbins:

Thank you. So you can find me at staceyrobbins.com. That website is being worked on pretty soon, but it gives an overview of what I do, but it doesn’t really tell you how you can work with me. But you can go there, and find me, and find my social media contacts. You can find some of my courses at staceyrobbinscoaching.com. And I’m working on a new website that’ll be coming out soon. I’ll let you know, and maybe you can share it with folks. And then I’m on social media on Instagram. I’m @lovestaceyrobbins. And then I’m on Facebook as well. So that is where you can find me.

Stacey Robbins:

And the work that I do, I do coaching, I do one-on-one coaching, I do small group coaching, I do workshops. And then I also have courses. And then I do my Italian retreats. So there are wonderful ways for us to connect together. Thanks for asking.

Amy:

Well, thanks so much for being here, and sharing with us today. And thank you all for listening. I look forward to being with you again very soon. Bye, bye.

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PCOS Podcast 147 - Epstein-Barr Virus - root of PCOS

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