Vegetarian or Vegan Diet for PCOS? [Podcast with Martha McKittrick] - PCOS Diva
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Vegetarian or Vegan Diet for PCOS? [Podcast with Martha McKittrick]

PCOS Podcast No. 148 Vegetarian or Vegan Diet “The problem is a lot of people who have PCOS are brainwashed into thinking you have to be on a low carb diet. You end up having tons of protein and maybe a lot of animal foods, and you’re not getting in enough plant-based foods. I think that’s probably the number one problem I see with my clients is that they’re just not eating enough vegetables.” – Martha McKittrick

There is no such thing as a “PCOS Diet.” Each person is different, and we each respond to different foods in unique ways. The heart of the PCOS Diva message is to find the foods that fuel your body, reduce inflammation, and leave you feeling great. A plant-rich diet is key for most people, but is a vegetarian or vegan diet right for you? Registered Dietitian Martha McKittrick returns to the podcast to answer this question and many more. Listen in or read the transcript as we discuss:

  • Pros and cons of a vegetarian/vegan diet
  • How to get enough protein on a plant-based diet without too many carbs
  • Practical tips on how to add more plant-based foods at every meal
  • How to approach soy and dairy
  • Supplements to consider when going vegetarian

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Mentioned in this episode:

Complete Transcript:

Amy:

I am welcoming back Martha McKittrick to the PCOS Diva Podcast. I think this is the fourth podcast we’ve done together. She’s one of my favorite guests. Martha is a registered dietician. She’s a certified diabetes educator, well coached certified health and wellness coach. And she has a private practice in New York City. She has over 25 years experience in the field of nutrition and Martha specializes in PCOS and she is really one of the pioneers in PCOS diet and nutrition. I’ve known her for some time now. And I’m just really glad to have her back to talk about a subject that we really have not delved in deep on the podcast yet. And that is plant-based diets for PCOS. Thank you so much for coming and sharing your knowledge and wisdom with us.

Martha:

Thanks, Amy. I’m really excited to be back. It’s funny because we are doing a total 360. I think the last podcast I did with you was on ketogenic diets. Now, we’re going way the opposite direction to plant based diet. I’m excited to dive into this topic.

Amy:

Yes. We talked about ketogenic diets. I think it was episode 84, I think if I’m correct, but we will list it in the show notes. We also talked about taming inflammation with diet choices on another podcast, and then a podcast that we did on the best diet for PCOS, which brings us to this subject. Because in that podcast about the best diets, we determined that there is no best diet for PCOS and you have to figure out what works best for you. For some women that could be a ketogenic type diet. For me, I know I do really well with more of the Mediterranean type anti-inflammatory diet that does include some animal protein. But I do get a lot of questions from women with PCOS who are vegan or vegetarian, and wanting to know if that’s a good way to thrive with PCOS. Thought we’d just examine plant-based diets and the pros and cons and how, if you are making that choice, how to make it work best for you. But I thought maybe we could just start by defining what is a plant based… I think of myself as eating a plant-based diet, even though I don’t only eat plants, but what’s your definition of a plant-based diet?

Martha:

Well, there are different types, really. I don’t think there’s one set plant-based diet. I think also when you hear the word vegetarian and vegan and then there’s whole food plant-based, I think the kind of diet that we’ll be talking about today is really more whole food plant-based, where you’re eating healthy types of carbohydrates. Because you could be a quote, vegetarian, and eat just no meat, fish, chicken, dairy, eggs, but do tons of white or processed carbohydrates. And some people do that actually. That’s not really the kind of diet we’re talking about. I’m talking more whole food plant-based, where the foods are not as processed. More whole grains, healthy kinds of oils, just excluding dairy, milk, eggs, meat, fish, chicken, that kind of thing.

Amy:

With you being also a diabetes educator, you know a lot about balancing blood sugar with diet. I know one concern that I always have, because I was never able to really manage it myself is having enough protein on a plant-based diet without having too many carbohydrates. In terms like if I eat too many beans, if I eat too much grains, like quinoa, I start feeling tired and fatigued and I know it’s affecting my blood sugar. I definitely would love for you to address what do you do about getting enough protein without too many carbs on a plant-based or non-animal food diet?

Martha:

Yeah. That’s a really good point. I think this really brings us back to, there’s no one size fits all approach for everybody. Many people do not do well on plant-based diets, just because there is no hunks of protein. And yes, you definitely can meet your protein needs on a plant-based diet, if you spend some time planning it out. I think we’ll get into that. Should you have soy? Because yes, if you have tofu or soy, it’s pretty easy to meet your protein needs on a plant-based diet, but not everybody wants to do that. It just doesn’t work for everybody, but it can work great for some people.

Here’s an example. I had a client contact me with PCOS and she also had diabetes and she really had her heart set on being totally plant-based. She really wanted to do it. She had heard a lecture on how good it was and she was trying so hard to do it, but her blood sugar just kept going up. She was eating healthy. She was definitely doing the whole grains and beans and all that and she was tired a lot. It just wasn’t working for her. My goal is never to convince somebody, “Oh, don’t be plant-based, don’t be vegetarian.” I would not do that to her. But I said, “Why don’t we just, as an experiment, maybe just add some fish in.” She didn’t even want to do chicken, but she did some fish and she actually did some Greek yogurt. And she said, she felt like a hundred times better and her blood sugar was under much better control. That proved for her, a total plant based was not a great idea.

But, I will say there are some studies out there that do show that plant-based diets can actually decrease risk of diabetes and are actually good for pre-diabetes. I think this, again, comes down to your own personal genetics and maybe your gut microbiome. What works for you, because we know there’s no one size fits all approach. I think it could be better for some than for others. You might think, well, how can a diet that’s high in carbohydrate possibly be good for blood sugar balance? What they think is that because there’s so much fiber, if properly done in a plant-based diet, and so many phytochemicals and antioxidants and magnesium and all these other components that can help with insulin resistance and inflammation that if properly done, it actually can help reduce risk of diabetes and can control blood sugar if properly done. But the problem is, I think not everybody does it properly. Then as I said, I don’t think it’s right for everybody, but you can meet your protein needs. We can definitely talk about that. But again, no one size fits all approach.

Amy:

As I was prepping for the podcast, I was thinking back to a guest that I had, Jessica Murnane, and she wrote a cookbook called One Part Plants. She had endometriosis and found that eating, not a strict meat free diet, but incorporating lots more plants into her diet really helped to tame the inflammation and the endometriosis. I think if we talk about how we can incorporate more plant-based food in your diet, even if you want to have a little bit of fish, like your client, or a little bit of Greek yogurt. I’m wondering if you could give us some tips on how to add more plant-based foods to help with inflammation of PCOS and things like endometriosis, which a lot of women with PCOS suffer from as well.

Martha:

Yeah. I don’t really promote total plant-based diets for most of my clients, unless they come to me and say, “Hey, this is what I want. Can you help me?” My first choice would not be go total plant-based. But I do think, Amy, like you said, a take home message from this would be to try and get more plant-based foods into your diet. This is a problem that I do see with a lot of people who have PCOS is that I think we’re so brainwashed into thinking you have to be on a low carb diet. What do you do? You end up having tons of protein and maybe a lot of animal foods, and you’re not getting in enough plant-based foods. I think that’s probably the number one problem I see with my clients is that they’re just not eating enough vegetables.

It’s so important for so many reasons. The first thing I might suggest is to keep a food record or a food journal for a week or two, we’d just get a baseline, look at your diet. Are you getting in a lot of plant-based foods? There was a really interesting study that came out that showed for people who eat 30 different plant-based foods a week, having a much healthier gut microbiome and better diversity. I thought, “Hey, I might try that, it’s pretty good.” I easily get in 30 different plant foods a week, I kept track. And it wasn’t. It was only maybe 20, because I think a lot of people might eat the same thing. Maybe you have chia seeds and fruit in the morning and maybe you love spinach and you love apples. But when you count up the different kinds of plant foods, a lot of us don’t have enough diversity.

The first thing, like I said, would keep a journal, get a baseline of where you’re at. Just look and see, are you getting in a good amount of vegetables a day? I like to tell people to really use, I call it the PCOS plate method, where they make half of their plate come from vegetables. It doesn’t have to be actually on a plate, but you could have a soup with vegetable. You could have a salad, just sneak vegetables into everything. You can use frozen vegetables as a backup. But to me, vegetables may be the most important food for PCOS, just because, again, the fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, which helps with inflammation, it can help with insulin resistance, helps with gut health. If we look at the drivers of PCOS, which we know are insulin resistance, inflammation, gut health, and then stress, but vegetables really help with three of those for sure. That might be my first suggestion is find ways to get vegetables into everything. Put some greens in your smoothie. I know Amy, you’re a fan of smoothies. Are you putting greens in your smoothies?

Amy:

Yeah. I think of smoothies as a way for me to get veggies in, first thing in the morning when they’re not that appetizing to me. Although, on a weekends day, when I’m up a little bit later and my stomach has woken up a little bit more, I do love having some greens with a light balsamic vinegarette and eggs. For some reason, I like scrambled eggs or maybe a frittata and then have some greens, not a big salad, just greens with a light vinegarette. Just really tasty for me as a brunch breakfast, but I can’t do that at 7:00 AM on a Tuesday. I think about smoothies as a great way to get greens in.

Martha:

You know what else you can do that sounds really weird, but it actually works is, I put sometimes some frozen cauliflower rice into the smoothie and it almost makes it be like ice. It makes it be thicker and you can’t even taste it. I think it’s being creative and just finding ways, throw veggies in with your eggs, throw it in your smoothie. When you have a salad, don’t just do greens, do leftover vegetables from the night before, just be creative. Lately I’ve been craving, I’ve been doing a lot of fennel, slivered fennel and slivered purple cabbage into my salad, just to think about the gut microbiome, which is so important for PCOS. And they’re showing a huge link between in altered gut microbiome and PCOS. I’m actually doing a lot of research on that right now. Just by eating more plant-based foods, you can dramatically improve your gut microbiome even within 24 hours. Think about that.

Amy:

Oh, also, I’ll just add another health benefit of eating a lot of plant-based foods and vegetables is being able to increase your sex hormone binding globulin. There was a study that I found, there were 33 women with PCOS, where they were able to increase their sex hormone binding globulin, which actually really helps to decrease your testosterone. It will help to balance hormones, and that’s another benefit of plant-based food.

Martha:

That’s awesome. Definitely. Just going back to the overall health risks of more plant-based diets would be decreasing hypertension, certain types of cancer. They’ve also done heart disease because the fiber in all these plant-based foods can lower cholesterol and that’s a lot of antioxidants which helps with too much oxidation again, which people with PCOS have. There are a lot of health benefits, how can we get more plant-based foods in? We’ve talked about the vegetables. Fruit is easy, but I think a lot of people are kind of programed that you shouldn’t have fruit if you have PCOS. I know there’s a lot of myths floating on the internet. You should only have one fruit a day. I don’t know where that came from, but it’s out there. No, you should not sit down and eat a pound of cherries, but you could certainly fit in a couple of servings of fruit a day.

You could throw berries in your smoothie, you could throw some berries into your yogurt, whether it’s plant-based yogurt or regular yogurt, you could even put fruit in a salad. You could obviously snack on fruit. A lot of things you can do just to get in a couple of servings of fruit a day. And then nuts, I’m a huge fan of nuts and seeds for PCOS. They’re a great snack, they’re filling. They had done some studies on that it helped in decrease risk of diabetes, it can lower cholesterol, it decreases inflammation. I love to always go back to the drivers of PCOS with the insulin resistance, inflammation and gut health, and find foods that help with that. And nuts to me are definitely a super food there.

Amy:

Yeah. I’m glad you mentioned seeds because I feel like they’re often overlooked and a lot of women have nut allergies. Seeds like pumpkin seed and hemp seed, you had mentioned chia, sunflower seeds. I always have bags, I get them at Trader Joe’s or Costco, of nuts and seeds. I put them in salads. I’m a big fan, you had talked about fennel and cabbage. I make slaws all year round and I put seeds in there or nuts, and I’ll put different types of fruit and other veggies in there. I’ll use different flavored vinegars, to create a dressing. Then, the other thing that you can do with nuts and seeds at breakfast time, and I have a recipe in my book is a seeded oatmeal. In addition to the oats, you add lots of different seeds to it, to add the fiber and the extra nutrients.

Martha:

Awesome. That slaw sounds right up my alley. I’m obsessed with flavored vinegars, I’m loving right now, fig vinegar.

Amy:

Oh my gosh. There’s a great shop that I go to in the summertime up in Ogunquit, Maine. And they have, it’s called The Sassy Olive and they have the best vinegar. Right now I’m using a cranberry pear and there’s a pumpkin spice vinegar that I love right now. You can do so much. The other thing that they’re really good for is roasting vegetables. You had mentioned putting different vegetables on your salads, roasting vegetables, and having with dinner, but then having leftovers for your lunch salad to eat cold and you can drizzle some of those thick flavorful balsamic vinegars, just to drizzle over the roasted vegetables. And they’re really yummy.

Martha:

Oh, that sounds amazing. That’s a great way to add flavor without too many calories or no fat. Awesome. In terms of seeds, I’m a huge fan of seeds. It’s funny because sometimes you hear some bad things about seeds, like they have too many omega 6’s, you shouldn’t eat them and that’s just not true at all. There’s so much nutrition in seeds and there’s fiber and vitamins and minerals and seeds are great. All different kinds of seeds. Flax seeds are a super food for PCOS because there was a study that was done where they showed people who had… It’s a lot of flaxseeds, it might have been four tablespoons a day, which is a lot, but they were able to lower their testosterone levels and to help with hirsutism by having ground flax seeds. That’s a great one and hemp seeds are really good because they’re high in protein. They’re the highest protein seed. Especially if you’re plant-based, it’s a really good way to get in extra proteins.

Amy:

Yeah. For a while, I haven’t been doing it lately, but I would have a little bag of hemp seeds in my purse when I would be caught off guard with low blood sugar. It was easy just to put a little handful of hemp seeds in my mouth. If I’m driving around, it keeps me from going to the Dunkin Donuts drive thru. It would make it easy to keep blood sugar balanced with just some hemp seeds in my purse.

Martha:

Nuts and seeds are super portable. Like you said, you just stick them in your purse. And then when you’re traveling around, you can grab them for a snack. What’s funny about nuts is they’ve done studies where, I think it’s maybe 20% of the calories don’t get absorbed when you eat an ounce of almonds. And I think it’s because you don’t chew it to a pulp in, I guess you have little chunks of almonds that don’t get digested. They’re not even as high calories, as some people think, which is interesting. We have more vegetables, more fruit, getting in nuts and seeds.

I’m also a fan of trying to get in some legumes, beans, and lentils, especially if you follow the plant-based diet, it is a source of protein. It has a ton of fiber and it actually has other health benefits of helping to decrease cholesterol because it’s very high in soluble fiber. It has a kind of fiber in it that’s really good for gut health. It has a low-glycemic effect. You’re not going to get blood sugar and insulin spikes and it’s very filling. That’s a great thing to do too.

Amy:

Yeah. I just was reading, probably about a month ago, Dr. Felice Gersh’s new book on fertility and she is recommending a cup of beans a day. Now, I don’t know if I would jump right into that because I think the amount of fiber and it could upset some people.

Martha:

Maybe if you live alone, it will be a good idea.

Amy:

You need some digestive enzymes with those beans, but you’re right, they’re super healthy for you. I’m curious how you like to use beans or type of recipes. I know I’m a huge fan of bean dip like hummus. I love making, especially at this time of year for an appetizer… Well, we’re recording this right before Christmas. Although it probably won’t go out for a couple months. But to bring an appetizer, I make a white bean dip with garlic and rosemary and olive oil. And it’s always such a hit. I just think people don’t really know how to properly prepare beans.

Martha:

Exactly. That sounds delicious. I like chili’s, I’m obsessed with chili or you can just do a vegetarian chili, you can make it yourself. And I’m a huge fan of batch cook, cooking and having some leftovers. And that’s something you can just freeze and just pull up for a quick meal on another day and you can throw in lots of other vegetables, you can add to the recipe. So you’re really getting a lot in there. That’s a good one.

Amy:

I think too, that canned beans, although they’re very convenient, I don’t think they taste as good as beans prepared freshly. Where you soak the dried beans overnight and then you cook them in a pressure cooker or on the stove. I think the texture is better.

Martha:

Yeah. I agree with you. I think when possible to cook them yourselves, not everybody’s going to want to do that, but another concern I have with canned beans is that they are in a can and now we’re talking endocrine disruptors. Not to freak everybody out with that, but if you’re eating too many canned foods, you are getting too much BPA, which we know is a big problem for PCOS. There’s at least one company called Eden, which does make canned beans without BPA in the lining. But I would say, when possible, cook yourself. But if you just know you’re not going to cook yourself, then get the can just rinse them out.

Other nutrients of concern that I like to say, if you are fully plant-based, what you would want to be careful with is we did talk about protein. Now, you should be able to meet your protein needs with some careful planning, but you have to really sit down and just see, what are you eating? Because if you’re just doing vegetables and whole grains and some nuts and seeds, you’re probably not going to be meeting your protein needs. I like people to aim for 25 to 30 grams per meal, if not more and you can do it, but it is going to take some planning. Good sources of protein that are plant-based would be nuts and seeds and beans. Quinoa actually has a fair amount of protein. And then, there’s seitan, if you don’t have issues with gluten. And then of course there’s tofu, which we probably should talk about.

Those are great sources of protein. You can definitely meet your needs if you’re incorporating these foods. This will probably be a good time to segway into, what are my thoughts on soy? Because soy, you hear a lot online about soy is not good for PCOS. The research has shown soy actually has benefits for PCOS, but I would caution you to try to get organic soy. You’re not going to get the pesticides, you’re not going to get the GMO crops. I would tell you not to do processed soy because too much process soy, we just don’t know the effect on PCOS because it’s so concentrated. Processed soy would be in some energy bars or some cereal there’s even chips out there. Whenever you look at a product that shouldn’t have a lot of protein and it has 20 grams of protein, chances are it’s because they’ve added in textured soy protein or hydrolyzed soy protein in there. They have bumped the protein up. I’m not a fan of fake steak soy, but real tofu, again especially if it’s organic, can have some health benefits for PCOS.

Amy:

Yeah. I agree with that, Martha. I think drinking soy milk, eating the soy hot dogs and chickenless nuggets, that’s not really how soy was intended to be eaten. I think miso, which is natto, which is a fermented soy product. I think that could be very helpful, especially for your gut. What do you think about edamame?

Martha:

I think I would call it edamame unprocessed. I’m fine with edamame.

Amy:

Yeah. A little of that on a salad.

Martha:

Yeah. It’s a great snack too, because it takes a while to eat. You get them in the shell. I think edamame is great. And anytime you can get fermented soy, like you said miso, lately I’m loving miso. I’m making some recipes like miso glazed cod and miso ginger salad dressing because miso is fermented, and studies have shown when you have fermented foods like kimchi and like miso, it has benefits for the gut, like you said. Huge difference between an organic fermented soy product and the kind of soy you get in fake chicken. Huge difference. That’s why we can’t lump it together.

Amy:

Right. I’m glad that you brought that up. Miso, it is such a nice ingredient to cook with it. It’s great to add to salad dressings and to soups. It has that rich earthy, what do they call that flavor? Umami. I don’t know if I’m saying it right, but it’s a real savory flavor that you would really only find with MSG, I think, products. But I would love a miso glazed salmon. That sounds really delicious.

Martha:

I made it for the first time last week it was delicious.

Amy:

That’s a good tip. The other thing that I’ll do is make just a simple miso soup for the kids. I know they’re not gluten free, but the kids like them, those little dumplings from Trader Joe’s. The chicken cilantro dumplings and it makes a nice, easy lunch.

Martha:

Yeah. Easy is good. Then the next nutrient of concern in a total plant-based diet would be calcium. What I want to say is, you don’t have to drink milk. I know we were brought up with the food pyramid as a dietician years ago, I was always pushing cow’s milk on people. I’m not anti-dairy for PCOS, but you do not have to get cow’s milk to meet your calcium needs, but you should pay attention to the foods that you’re eating to make sure you are getting in enough calcium. I usually suggest trying to get to close to 1000 milligrams and you can easily do that. There are so many good fortified non-dairy milks out there. Lots of good nut milks, there’s cashew milk, there’s almond milk. There are other four to five products with calcium in it. You can get calcium from almonds, from chia seeds and then from leafy greens. Just pay attention, if you’re not doing regular yogurt, that you’re getting your calcium from other sources.

Amy:

Yeah. I remember reading somewhere that kale has more calcium per calorie or something than milk.

Martha:

Leafy greens have a lot. Almonds have a lot, surprisingly. For an ounce, I don’t have the number in front of me, I think it’s 200 milligrams. It’s quite a bit. The fortified, non-dairy milks have a lot. Granted, they are crushing up a calcium supplement and putting it in the milk for the most part. It’s not natural calcium, but it still can help your bones. One glass of almond milk is about three or 400 milligrams of calcium, which is similar to cow’s milk. So you can definitely meet your calcium needs with without real dairy.

Amy:

If you’re struggling with infertility and you’re on a vegan, strict plant-based diet, something that I’ve been looking into and I’ve been reading from different hormone experts that sometimes you need the amino acids in animal food to help boost your fertility. I’m just wondering if you have any thoughts on that?

Martha:

For somebody who is trying to conceive, my first choice is probably not a plant-based diet, but that being said, it can be done. You just would have to pay attention to supplementation. For example, choline. If you’re not eating eggs or animal products, you’re not going to meet your choline needs. You would be taking a prenatal, so you will be getting in extra iron and extra other B vitamins. I haven’t heard about the amino acid profile. I mean, it makes sense, but I don’t think I can really answer that one way or the other. But you would definitely have to take a prenatal. You would have to pay attention to your vitamin D, but everybody has to pay attention to vitamin D whether you’re plant-based or not, but iron could definitely be an issue, choline for sure. Omega threes because you’re not eating fatty fish, but again, you would be taking your prenatal to get your EPA and DHA, vitamin B12, which is a common deficiency in plant-based and I’m assuming that would be in your prenatal. You just have to pay special attention.

Amy:

Yeah. I was going to mention B12 as well because so many women with PCOS are also on birth control pill and Metformin, and both of those deplete vitamins, especially B vitamins.

Martha:

Oh, Metformin does a number on your B12. You got to make sure you keep track of that. What I’m obsessed with, which is loaded with B12 is nutritional yeast. When I first heard of the word nutritional yeast, I’m like, this sounds really disgusting. There’s no way. And I looked at, it’s this yellow powder and stuff. I’m like, this is going to be so nasty. But as a dietician, I have to try things. I tried it and now it’s like, I love it. I put it on scrambled eggs. I put it on spinach. It tastes much better than Parmesan cheese, has a bit of a cheesy taste, but it’s really good. And it’s packed with vitamin B12 and also is quite high in protein.

Amy:

That is a great tip because I know so many women are avoiding dairy, whether it’s for digestive issues. I know for me, it definitely is disruptive. It causes a lot of acne for women. Nutritional yeast and my son is completely dairy free, because he loves to cheese, I need to let him know about that.

I didn’t even think about that. I’ve been buying him the Violife cheese. To me, that’s the best tasting vegan cheese. A lot of good info in today’s podcast about trying to integrate more plant-based food into your diet and what to look for. If you are plant-based already and what nutrients you need to just make sure that you’re getting. Any other last thoughts about plant-based diets for PCOS?

Martha:

When you visit with your doctor, just make sure you check for nutritional deficiencies. Everybody should always be checked for vitamin D, but also B12 and iron. Pay special attention to calcium. Don’t depend on overly processed products. Like the fake chicken, make sure it’s natural, organic soy. Do a journal. So you can see where there may be shortcomings in your diet. You may also want to meet with a nutritionist who specializes in plant-based diets just to make sure you’re doing the right thing, because it is really important. I think most importantly is to listen to how your body feels. I’ve had people tell me, “I went plant-based, I feel fantastic. My skin cleared up, I have so much energy.” And I have other people who think they should do it. And they’re just not feeling well. They’re hungry all the time. They’re tired. You have to find what works for you.

Amy:

Yeah. I also heard you say the importance of planning and I am finding more and more coaching clients that that’s when things really fall apart, is the lack of planning. I think that planning for a plant-based diet for PCOS, that has to be the number one thing, because you can’t just go out to dinner every night and probably be able to be within the parameters of protein and everything that you talked about.

Martha:

That’s a really good point, Amy. Thanks for bringing that up. I think it’s even more important, like you said for plant-based, because if you’re eating on the run and you’re going to grab a turkey sandwich, you can’t do that. What are you going to grab? And usually on the run, you don’t find really healthy little quinoa bean dishes. You’ve got to plan your snacks with you. You’ve got to plan the dinners. If you go out to dinner or order in, plan. Where are some places you can get healthy things from, that’s really important.

Amy:

Martha, tell us more about how we can find out more about your work. I know you have an exciting new book coming out very soon. Tell us more.

Martha:

I do. You can head on over to my website. It’s marthamckittricknutrition.com. I do have a PCOS blog on there where I have lots of free downloads. You can get ideas for meal plans, you can get ideas for plant-based meal plans. I’m not a plant-based dietician, but I do like to cater to everybody. You can get low carb, all different kinds of meal plans for free. I did a blog post on plant-based diets for PCOS. You can get all this information and more on my blog. I’m very active on Instagram, that’s my main platform. And I am the PCOS dietician, with periods in between each word, because there’s a bunch of PCOS dieticians. I’m The period PCOS period dietician. And I do have an online group program for managing PCOS with nutrition and lifestyle strategies, which I run about two or three times a year, that’s on my website. Email me if you have any questions. I’m also available for virtual coaching across the United States.

Amy:

Great. You do have a great Instagram. I love when you go to Trader Joe’s and you let us see, take a sneak peek what’s in your cart.

Martha:

Right.

Amy:

Well, thank you so much for joining us again. And I hope that everybody enjoyed this podcast, and I look forward to being with you again very soon. Bye-bye.

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