PCOS Diva Perfect Prenatal - PCOS Diva
PCOS Diva Perfect Prenatal
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Other prenatals were pretty pathetic compared to the Perfect Prenatal – I’m so glad I found this site! I feel better when I take the perfect prenatal- even now while nursing. I have the MTHFR gene mutation and need the folate instead of the folic acid.

- Margaret

PCOS Diva Perfect Prenatal

Provides optimal supplementation for pregnant and breastfeeding women.

$46.00 180 Capsules

PCOS Diva Perfect Prenatal

$46.00

SKU: PCDPRE-PL
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PCOS Diva Perfect Prenatal provides optimal and well-rounded supplementation for pregnant and breastfeeding women. This prenatal multivitamin contains naturally-occurring folates in place of synthetic folic acid. Natural folate is more easily processed by our bodies and can be more readily utilized as compared to folic acid which must be converted in our bodies before it can be used. This is particularly important to the portion of the population that cannot process folic acid efficiently.  In addition, the minerals in Perfect Prenatal are true chelates, which provide superior absorption.

These minerals are dosed at levels to help achieve optimal results, such as:
•Calcium and magnesium – healthy bone formation
•Ferrochel chelated iron – most bioavailable on the market, non-constipating
•chelated zinc – to reduce risk of pre-term babies
•Iodine – deficiency in infancy can lead to learning disabilities

All expectant mothers want the same thing- a healthy baby.  Since the health of the mother is the most important factor in the health of the baby, expectant moms need to take even better care of themselves during pregnancy.  That starts with diet and lifestyle and includes taking the right supplements.

Studies show that women who take supplements showed a marked improvement in nutrient status and a reduction in numbers of low birth weight babies.  Unfortunately, many supplements marketed as “prenatal vitamins” are lacking critical minerals, are dosed at levels way too low to be effective, and/or contain unhealthy food dyes.  PCOS Diva Perfect Prenatal was formulated by doctors and nutritionists to provide optimal nutrients in a safe and effective supplement.

Pregnant women are often told they need folic acid.  In fact, pregnant women need folates.  The two words are often used interchangeably, but there is a big difference.  Folic acid is a synthetic lab-produced B vitamin that can’t be used by our bodies without some extra work.

Folic acid must go through several conversion steps in our intestinal cells before becoming a form that we can use. Natural folate, which is found in leafy green vegetables, does not have to be processed by our intestinal cells and can be readily used.

Folates are critical throughout a person’s lifetime, but it is particularly important during fetal development.  Folates help with DNA synthesis which keep cells running and metabolism functioning.  It is so widely recognized as an important nutrient that there is an extensive movement to include folic acid in processed foods. The hope is that, in this way, people will consume enough of it.  There is one problem with that.  Folic acid has to be processed by the body into folate before it can be used.  For many people, this is not a problem.  However, for as much as 40% of the population, this process is impaired because they have a mutation in a gene called MTHFR.  People with the MTHFR gene are 80% less efficient at converting folic acid to folate and so, are deficient even if they take folic acid.  To make matters worse, folic acid that cannot be used stays in our systems for about 100 days, binding to our cells and blocking nutrients from entering, and it is associated with higher occurrence of certain cancers.  The solution, take a supplement that contains folates which the body can use without conversion.

For more information about MTHFR, read the PCOS Diva article, What Every Woman Needs to Know About Folic Acid, by Dr. Fiona McCulloch ND and MTHFR- What is It and How This Can Effect Your Fertility.

More Resources:

Bland J. Systems biology, functional medicine, and folates. Altern. Ther. Health Med. 2008 May-Jun;14(3):18-20. Review.

Center for Disease Control (CDC). IMMPACT Project. http://www.cdc.gov/immpact/micronutrients/index.html#Folate

Gregory, Jesse, Jerry Williamson, Jo-Fu Liao, and John Toth. “Kinetic Model of Folate Metabolism in Nonpregnant Women Consuming [2H2]Folic Acid: Isotopic Labeling of Urinary Folate and the Catabolite Para-Acetamidobenzoylglutamate Indicates Slow, Intake-Dependent, Turnover of Folate Pools.” Journal of Nutrition. American Society for Nutrition, Nov. 1989. Web.

Lightfoot TJ, Barrett JH, Bishop T, Northwood EL, Smith G, Wilkie MJ, Steele RJ, Carey FA, Key TJ, Wolf R, Forman D. Methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase genotype modifies the chemopreventive effect of folate in colorectal adenoma, but not colorectal cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Sep;17(9):2421-30.
Kresser, Chris. “The Little Known (but Crucial) Difference between Folate and Folic Acid.” Chris Kresser. Chris Kresser, 9 Mar. 2012. Web.

Obeid, R., W. Holzgreve, and K. Pietrzik. “Is 5-methyltetrahydrofolate an Alternative to Folic Acid for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects?” National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 Sept. 2013.

Powers, HJ. “Folic Acid under Scrutiny.” National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine, 13 Aug. 2007.

Smith, DE, JM Hornstra, RM Kok, HJ Blom, and YM Smulders. “Folic Acid Supplementation Does Not Reduce Intracellular Homocysteine, and May Disturb Intracellular One-carbon Metabolism.” Pubmed.gov. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Aug. 2013. Web..

“Three of the B Vitamins: Folate, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12.” The Nutrition Source. Harvard School of Public Health, n.d. Web.

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